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LANDSCAPE LIGHTING TECHNIQUES

  
  
  
  
  
  

LIGHT the night...
There are many lighting techniques to consider when designing your outdoor lighting plan. Layering different types of lighting adds visual interest to your design. Keep in mind that several fixtures focused on an area from multiple angles can highlight an object with a softer light than a single very bright fixture that casts deep shadows. Here, Hinkley offers some basic techniques that will help add visual interest to your home's exterior and surrounding landscape after the sun goes down.

Uplighting
 
Downlighting
 
Grazing

UPLIGHTING
Uplighting refers to illuminating an object, area, or surface from below.          

For the effect shown here, a spotlight is aimed at the tree in the foreground while the front of the home remains relatively dark. This method creates a focal point in the landscape.

 

 

DOWNLIGHTING & MOONLIGHTING
Downlighting describes the illumination of an object, area or surface from above. Moonlighting creates a natural effect. The light, usually mounted high inside the canopy of a tree, bathes the ground with a soft glow.

For the effect shown here, spotlights are placed in hidden overhead locations and are pointed down to illuminate the sculpture in the center of the courtyard. Subtle areas of light and shadow are created on the ground.

GRAZING
Grazing emphasizes a textured surface (such as a tree trunk, a stone wall, climbing ivy, etc.) by placing a light source within one foot of that surface and aiming the light beam parallel to that surface.

For the effect shown here, spotlights are placed beneath each stone pillar to create shadows and dimension, complimenting the home's entryway.

 


 

Path Lighting

 

 

PATH & AREA LIGHTING

Path and area lighting is used to enhance landscaping such as flower beds, shrubbery and borders while safely illuminating pathways.

For the effect shown here, path lights are staggered around the walkway to illuminate a safe passageway to the home's entrance and to emphasize the dynamic design of the landscape.    

 

 Step Lighting  
Wall Washing
 
Silouetting

STEP LIGHTING

Step and brick lights can be used in masonry and wood constructions. These fixtures are designed to safely illuminate stairways and walkways.                    

 

 

 

 

WALL WASHING

Wall washing is a technique that refers to the general illumination of a wall or surface.

For the effect shown here, spotlights are placed along the front of the home to create a soft wash of light.

 

 

 

SILHOUETTING

Also called backlighting, silhouetting is used to dramatize an interesting-shaped object.

For the effect shown here, a spotlight is placed between the tree and the front of the home. The spotlight is aimed at the front of the home creating a dramatic silhouette of the tree. 



 
Shadowing
 
Deck Lighting

SHADOWING

Shadowing is an effect created by placing a light source in front of an object and projecting a shadow onto a surface behind the object.

For the effect shown here, spotlights are placed directly in front of the cacti, developing shadows which are projected on the home's face creating an interesting and inviting facade. 

 

 

 STEP & BENCH (DECK) LIGHTING

Step and brick lights can be used in masonry and wood constructions. These fixtures are specifically designed to provide safety and accent lighting.

For the effect shown here, a surface mounted deck sconce is placed on the wall above each step to illuminate a safe entryway to the deck. Using an under bench light, a soft glow creates a warm atmosphere for seating in this outdoor area.

 

Hinkley Lighting

Hinkley Lighting is our featured brand of landscape lighting and Lighting Catalog has all of your Hinkley Lighting needs whether it is Hinkley Outdoor Lighting, Hinkley Path Lighting or Hinkley Landscape Lighting.  

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